Sully, America's Newest Hero

Dear Loose Gravel,

How do I become a hero apropos of the U.S. Airways crash landing yesterday?

Signed,
Iwannabegijoe

hero.defined.jpg
(link) to above definition

Dear Iwannabegijoe,

Short answer: Not easily.

Yesterday Captain C.B. "Sully" Sullenberger demonstrated for his co-workers, his company, his flight passengers, and really the rest of the world, what he most likely already knew: Nothing but ice water flows through his veins.

In the ultimate tough-guy maneuver, the intrepid Sully made the decision to land an Airbus A320 with 170 passengers in the Hudson River after geese killed both engines while flying over New York City. Apparently he and his co-pilot made all the right moves, and everyone on the plane not only survived, but escaped major injury.

He not only made a great decision to ditch the jet in the river, he cleared a bridge by 900 feet, avoided all of many obstacles that are present along every big-city river, and glided the jet right between two ferry lines. That's just bad-to-the-bone. Clint Eastwood-esque. It was a shockingly well-executed day for Sully from the time he realized his engines were toast-onward.

Nomatter what I do in my lifetime, I doubt I'm ever going to have decide how best keep 200 people alive in a dire situation. I'm a civil servant by day and I provide advice on a blog at night. Not exactly hero material. Just warm blood in these veins, sir.

And you know the passengers on the plane were glad they got Sully, the flight instructor-air force veteran and not Troy, the just-out-of-flight-school beer hammer. Orbitz hasn't added the "flight crew experience" selector for booking flights yet, because when do, where fall to the mercy of whomever has been deemed adequate to navigate a commercial passenger jet. I'm guessing that more often than not, we're not getting a Sully. From how the story reads, it seems like he was able to guide a very dire situation to a place of highest success and survivability. The passengers were orderly and helpful. Because of where Sully ditched the plane, Ferry boats were able to offer immediate help. If this guy isn't a hero, I just don't know what a hero is.

His legend is already starting to take form. You see, Sully walked the sinking plane twice to make sure there were no passengers still on board the plane. Of course he did. He is, after all, the captain, and he was the last one off the plane.

I'm really not sure what it takes to become a hero. I am certain, however, that unlike Sully, the work-related choices I make between the hours of 8am and 5pm are not ever going to encite hero-worship.

I think we need to know a little more about Sully. What else can he do for America? Or better, what can't he do. Once you crash land a commercial flight in the Hudson river with zero casualties and receive hero status, you have to wonder if the man has any limits.
Dear Loose Gravel,

How do I become a hero apropos of the U.S. Airways crash landing yesterday?

Signed,
Iwannabegijoe

hero.defined.jpg
(link) to above definition

Dear Iwannabegijoe,

Short answer: Not easily.

Yesterday Captain C.B. "Sully" Sullenberger demonstrated for his co-workers, his company, his flight passengers, and really the rest of the world, what he most likely already knew: Nothing but ice water rides through his veins.

In the ultimate tough-guy maneuver, the intrepid Sully made the decision to land an Airbus A320 with 170 passengers in the Hudson River after geese killed both engines while flying over New York City. Apparently he and his co-pilot made all the right moves, and everyone on the plane not only survived, but escaped major injury.

He not only made a great decision to ditch the jet in the river, he cleared a bridge by 900 feet, avoided any of many obstacles that are present along every big-city river, and put the jet right between two ferry lines. That's just bad-to-the-bone. It was a shockingly well-performed day for Sully from the time he realized his engines were toast-onward.

Nomatter what I do in my lifetime, I doubt I'm ever going to have decide how best keep 200 people alive in a dire situation. I'm a civil servant by day and I provide advice on a blog at night. Not exactly hero material. Just warm blood in these veins, sir.

And you know the passengers on the plane were glad they got Sully, the flight instructor-veteran and not Troy the first year newbie. Orbitz hasn't added the "flight crew experience" selector for booking flights yet. When we book flights, we get whomever has been deemed adequate to navigate a commercial passenger jet, and I'm guessing that more often than not, we're not getting Sully. From how the story reads, it seems like he was able to guide a very dire situation to a place of highest success and survivability. The passengers were orderly and helpful. Because of where Sully ditched the plane, Ferry boats were able to offer immediate help. If this guy isn't a hero, I just don't know what a hero is.

His legend is already starting to take form. You see, Sully walked the plane twice to make sure there were no passengers still on board the plane. Of course he did. He is, after all, the captain, and he was the last one off the plane.

I'm really not sure what it takes to become a hero. I am certain, however, that unlike Sully, the work-related choices I make between the hours of 8am and 5pm are not ever going to encite hero-worship.

I think we need to know a little more about Sully. What else can he do for America? Or better, what can't he do. Once you crash land a commercial flight in the Hudson river with zero casualties and receive hero status, you have to wonder if the man has any limits.

0 Comments

Share your thoughts

Comments are the sole responsibility of the person posting them. You agree not to post comments that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. Click here for our full user agreement.

About

Search this blog

Recent Posts