| Kansas City, MO

« "Not impressed with today's rain" | Main | "A front approaches" »

 March 21, 2007

"Split flow" and "Extreme Weather"

Good morning everyone,

Don't forget our special, "Extreme Weather". It is on tonight right after Wheel of Fortune at 7 PM! We will be remembering the Ruskin Heights tornado, the February 28th outbreak, and showing some fascinating tornado footage from the EF 5 tornado that cut through our region on May 4, 2003. And, I will be issuing our spring weather forecast towards the end of the show.

Yesterday's rainfall may have been rather disappointing if you wanted more than 1/4 inch or so, but there are more chances in the forecast. Even with these chances the forecast is not easy at all. We are caught between two streams in the upper levels of the atmosphere. Look below:

500 mb 24hr fcst.gif
500 mb flow valid at 1 AM tonight

500 mb 36hr fcst.gif
500 mb flow valid at 1 PM Thursday

The top map is valid at 1 AM Thursday morning. I have circled the northern branch wave that is rapidly moving across in a west to east flow up there. You can see the cut off low that has formed near Baja California.

The second map is valid at 1 PM Thursday. The northern branch wave has said "good bye" and is quickly moving through southern Canada and the northern Great Lakes. We are even more in the southern branch.

So, how are these two streams interacting? The northern branch wave, as it rapidly moves by, is bringing a cold front down into our region. But, then this front gets left behind and the southern branch will want to "rip it apart", or perhaps weaken it and not allow any further southward movement. The front will likely stall right near Kansas City as a result. Where it stalls and moves and is positioned will be very important as thunderstorms will be most likely near this front for the next three days. This is what we will be tracking on NBC Action News during the next few days.

There is a SLIGHT risk of severe thunderstorms late tonight, and the SPC has no risk for tomorrow. This front just weakens too much. But, we will have to watch it carefully. I mentioned in one of your comments last night that talking about supercells and tornado threats over two days out is just scaring viewers. We can discuss the potential, but this kind of serious discussion should wait until the day before to see if it is really setting up. As we go through the spring let's be careful about talking about severe weather risks one week away. Now, if there is a major storm in the forecast we can talk about it, but to get so specific is ridiculous. Let us know what you think. I know for many of you severe weather season is your favorite time of the year. So, I think you have a thirst for as much information as possible. We will be realistic in our discussions and if there is truly a serious threat we will discuss it. This situation for tonight, up to this point, has just not been that ideal of a severe weather set up for our local region. If it were to look more likely then we will go into all of the details. Right now the main threat is rain, thunder and lightning and NOT large hail and tornadoes. So why talk about it two days before hand?

Gary

Posted by at March 21, 2007 6:46 AM

Comments

*******************
I will definitely watch the special tonight. I'm interested to see your spring weather outlook. If I remember last year's special, you said May would be active, and surprisingly, it was not that active at all, around here at least. Was it just one of those things you can't really describe? You're still the most accurate in my book.
------------------
Justin,

After it was over and looking back I think we could have known that the early season outbreaks were just that, early season outbreaks. And, that the overall pattern wasn't going to support a lot of severe weather. So, did we learn? I believe so. This pattern is different and we will discuss this on the special tonight.

Gary

Posted by: Justin at March 21, 2007 7:19 AM

************
Hello, do you have any weather info for the first week of April?? A J
--------------
AJ,

There is a lot going on between now and the first week of April. But, it looks active that week.

Gary

Posted by: ajr at March 21, 2007 7:27 AM

**************
Gary:

Good Spring morning to you sir!!!! Sure feels like Spring outside this morning-and while it may be amazing to some on here, I do like it!!!! LOL My blogs have become sparse due to a frantic pace at school but thought I would chime in with my totals: we got around .20 of an inch yesterday here in SW Lawrence. I was hoping for more and with a warm front advancing and the early radar returns to our south (even heard a clap of thunder around 7:30 A.M. yesterday) I thought we may get a real good soaker. Oh well-I'll take what we can get. Lawrence is already more than an inch behind for the year so any rain is good!!!!

Thanks for the great explanation in this mornings blog-I have been following this week into next week (I'm sleeping outside with 12 highschool kids Sunday-Wednesday as part of a community service project)but my skills weak at best in winter are even worse in Spring and Summer LOL-however, while I hope Sunday-Wednesday are dry for the most part, I will be somewhat disappointed if we can't pick up 3/4 of an inch over the next 4-5 days. We need the rain here!!! Oh-the LRC is just all over this and by following it, one knew that March was going to be warmer than normal. Intersting that the longer range model outputs are showing colder weather (compared to average) beginning in April-the LRC is all over this!!!!

Have a great day

Bill in Lawrence
---------------
Bill,

The LRC would indicate that from mid April to mid May is the most likely time to be below average. We will see if it materializes. I believe it will. Between now and then we should have some severe weather and enough rain to catch us up to at least if not above average.

You are more like me. We LOVE winter weather more than the rest of the year.

Gary

Posted by: Bill Gollier at March 21, 2007 7:42 AM

***************
Gary I agree about discussing severe weather a week in advance. I have seen some sources over the years get so excited and nothing develops or maybe it does but it is a hit and miss situation. I suppose as a trained meteorologist you can see certain situations begin to develop but you really don't want to begin discussing it with the public until maybe two days out just to be sure? Did you here from the global experts concerning our past winter that again it was above average in the Northern Hemisphere. Yet you will here from some folks that they were running close to average as far as temperature goes. Interesting I think. However I confess that I love weather history especially tornado history. Keep up the good work. Michael/Topeka/Berryton
---------------------
Michael,

It was the warmest winter ever, globally. Not in our part of the hemisphere, but the average over the enire northern hemisphere.

Gary

Posted by: michael huffman at March 21, 2007 7:54 AM

*************
Gary,
i'm sorry about mentioning the supercells and stuff last night, i didnt realize it was that big of a deal, i didnt realize id scare anyone, so im sorry i mentioned anything about it and offended you in any way or anybody else for that case.
--------------------
Randy,

Don't worry at all. I wasn't offended. It just allowed me to make a point. We will talk supercells and tornadoes on the days where the chance is more than 1%.

Gary

Posted by: Randy at March 21, 2007 8:27 AM

*************
Gary,
Last night in the Lawson area we had some really neat weather that I had not experienced before. We had thick fog < 1/4 mile visibility. With the fog, we had about 15 minutes of significant lightning strikes. I had never observed lightning in fog before. With this happening my wife asked a question I could not answer. Was the lightning from the clouds on the ground around us or was it from storms passing over the fog? By the way, while this was happening, one of your colleagues from a competing channel was reporting the rain was done for the night and all we would experience for the rest of the night was fog. (Since the rain was gone, we had a lot of lightning and really big drops of fog beating on our house for about 15 minutes...)About 30 minutes later you came on air reporting thunderstorms in our area. Like you say, it is always best to look outside before the weather segment...
---------------
Cris,

It is amazing how many meteorologists do not do rule #1, always look outside because you never know. I saw those thunderstorms pop up around 9 PM. And, I wondered if others knew about them. I am not surprised at all. Very funny!

Anyway, to answer your question. The fog was being caused by the warm front to the south becoming active and pushing our way. Moisture was being forced into the cooler low level air mass and fog was the result. But, also thunderstorms formed above the fog. If you were in an airplane you would have been able to see the big cumulonimbus clouds that were forming right over your head.

Gary

Posted by: Cris at March 21, 2007 8:38 AM

***************
Hey Gary-
I see what you're saying about not discussing the potential for specific storm threats a week before. Maybe some of the other weather forecaster's should do the same. I can recall another personality telling some viewers to sleep in their basements a good couple of days before a storm. Not good at all when you have a wife that's deathly afraid of severe weather. Anyway just a question for you... If severe weather were to strike from midnight to say 3 or 4 in the morning, would you be on the air?
Thanks
Greg
-----------------
Greg,

Great question and the answer is YES! We will be there for any serious severe weather threat regardless of the time of day or night.

Gary

Posted by: Greg D. at March 21, 2007 8:43 AM

***************
Since I don't like snow, I do find severe weather more interesting, although I don't want anyone to get hurt.However, with the blitz of criticism lately over tornado watches and hyping the forecast in that direction, I totally agree with you about not wanting to make an issue of it several days out. There was another editorial in the JoCo Neighborhood Section of the Star this week really ripping the weather forecasting.
I also recall that last year, I believe, TWC was out in KCK awaiting the tornado outbreak which would rival May 4th as the set up was supposed to be the same. Schools cancelled outdoor activities, everyone was in a panic, and ...nothing! It was a big bust. So I think it's good that you let us know the potential is there but make no promises days in advance, even though every 3rd question asks you the same thing.
But since I need a little activity somewhere so Sean can call me to go on a tour, I am hoping for some weather somewhere this spring.
---------------
Jeri,

There will be severe weather through the plains, but it doesn't always mean it will be in our viewing area. So, Sean will find you some great thunderstorms to chase.

Gary

Posted by: Jeri Correll at March 21, 2007 8:55 AM

*****************
SPC now has KC to Omaha from 2% to 5% tornado potential
--------------
Bill,

We see some potential in Nebraska around sunset tonight. This threat would mainly be a hail threat for the extreme northwest corner of Missouri by around midnight to 3 AM, and then mainly a rain threat by morning closer to us.

Gary

Posted by: Bill at March 21, 2007 9:03 AM

************
Gary-

What do you think the timing of our next rains will be? Overnight tonight, or centered more toward mid morning tomorrow?

And we got about 1/2 inch of rain down here yesterday.

Thanks,

Marcus in Louisburg
----------------
Marcus,

Thanks for the rainfall report. I had 0.39" at my house in south Overland Park.

The next threat of signficant rain will be when the front moves through on Thursday morning. Right now it appears to be 4 to 8 AM. But it already looks very different than how it looked last night. Suddenly the better chance may come in later Thursday or Thursday night. A very complex weather pattern.

Gary

Posted by: Marcus at March 21, 2007 9:07 AM

*****************
Gary,
Your point about severe weather forecasting more than a day out is a mixed bag. I will not totally agree with your point, but do see its merits.

For the common viewer, yes I agree completely. I think this is more of a scare tactic. But…I would also assert this time of year, where conditions are favorable for thunderstorms, about 30-40% of the time, one of them will go severe in this part of the country. So, in forecasting out 3-5 days, noting the potential and components of an outbreak can be notable. The caveat should always be that this would cover a large area until the day of, and that this could be used as a tool, not a scare tactic. This time of year yields a great deal of atmospheric “controlled chaos? and in point it out and a general location should not be viewed always as a scare tactic. I firmly believe the viewer owns just as much responsibility to reaction as the meteorologist.

If we want to really think about the fear factor, I will note the change even from the NWS and EMS. Traditionally, sirens would sound for an entire county during a tornado warning, when only a small area is affected. This encourages this behavior. Finally, they are working to change this with the polygons approach, limiting the action area…but…prior to this, “scare tactics? have always been a gray area. Remember even 50 years ago when the NWS wouldn’t even mention the word tornado! The public has come along way, but we cannot stop the education because of perception.
-----------------
Scott,

We can discuss the severe weather potential 3 to 5 days out, even a week for that matter. But, my point is to say we may have tornadoes three days away is like issuing a tornado watch way too far in advance. We can discuss it, but we must be careful about how we talk about it on the air.

Gary

Posted by: Scott at March 21, 2007 9:11 AM

*****************
I think it is best to keep the tornado factor to a minimum until at least the night before. If you know their is a significant risk and the conditions are prime then by all means the night before discuss it. Reason being for me is that in the am when people are up and running around for work they may not have a chance to watch TV or get on the computer to check the weather for the day and they may miss out on the info until the weather is already taking shape. But that is just my thought. I think you all do a great job not making drama out of nothing though.

Speaking of drama.....the station that said "sleep in your basements" last time also had their current radar on the TV screen during programming last night. Would you have any clue as to why they did that?? Their were some showers to the east but nothing big...it was kinda weird I thought. So during a commercial I changed channels to see if you or anyone else had theirs up and no body else did. Weird huh?

Looking forward to your program tonight...I bet it is great.
Monica
--------------
Monica,

I didn't know this. The only reason I can think they did this is "hype". There was no threat of severe weather last night, at least we didn't think so. This is not a good trend.

Gary

Posted by: Monica at March 21, 2007 9:50 AM

Gary, First let me state that I think you and your weather team do great during severe weather. I agree with you that it is not a good idea to talk about severe weather a week out. Also, here just a bit ago it was thundering outside, I wanted to know if there is a severe threat for today and tonight and what kind of severe weather can we expect? Thanks and keep up the good work, Robin
---------------------
Robin,

There is no chance of severe weather today. A fast moving wave went by already. The SPC issued a severe thunderstorm watch, but they should have waited. There is only one small thunderstorm left and it is racing off into Livingston county.

Thursday morning, well, there is a possibility of some hail with the thunderstorms with this set up after 5 AM.

Gary

Posted by: robin at March 21, 2007 10:28 AM

****************
Gary,
In reflection of some learned information from the seminar, it brings me to a question. I learned that when the SPC is considering a watch area [often based on the convective/mesoscale discussions], they will set up a call with the affected NWS offices within the projected area. In this discussion, the SPC will recommend a watch area, and the individual NWS offices can agree or opt out. I recall asking if media was invited to these calls, and the answer was no.

This brings up two thoughts….

1. It was interesting to learn that if a metro area is on the fringes, that the NWS may opt out as not to interrupt media programming or cause undo concern. Seems like this is a risky proposition if you are being excluded from communication, awareness or preparedness because of other commercial/personal interests. This thought is focused at the NWS, not media, since media is not invited.

2. Now, if there is this triangle of cooperation between the NWS, EMS [spotter networks included], and media, how is it that the voice of weather communication is not part of this discussion? Since the NWS relies on media coverage [spotter reports] as does EMS, how can this be? Also, Gary..I know you rely more on your own forecasts than what the NWS puts out…how do you stay in the loop?

Gary, what are your thoughts on this?

Also..to follow up on the severe forecasts…I think mentioning tornados in the area is a bit irresponsible that far out, but agree that it is fair to discuss the potential for severe weather… Short of a high or moderate risk, I agree it should be discussed closer to the event.
------------------
Scott,

I think we are in complete agreement now. And, the SPC just issued a severe thunderstorm watch. If you look at the statement from our own NWS it states that they aren't too sure about this one. So, the SPC very often will issue something without any coordination at all. This watch is really not necessary for just that one thundershower that is barely staying alive at this moment.

And, there is cooperation between the NWS and the local media. But, they still make their own forecast. And, if we share too much information it will help our competition. This blog must already do that. Remember it is competitive out there. But, when it comes to a serious tornado threat everyone comes together.

Gary

Posted by: Scott at March 21, 2007 10:49 AM

**************
I just wanted to say that I agree with not going crazy about the severe weather threat. This is Kansas and it is March. Anything can happen. I get really paranoid when weather stations start talking about the threat of toranadoes. My house was hit by the F4 that went through western Wyandotte County. It was a really scary exprience and don't ever want to go through it again. I know that you and your weather team do a wonderful job and I trust you guys, and you don't hype up the weather just to make it interesting. You do your best to make sure that we know what could happen, but most of all what isn't going to happen. I just wish that other stations would take the time and think before they start causing chaos.
----------------
Megan,

Thanks! And, if there is a serious threat then you know we will be talking about it.

Gary

Posted by: megan at March 21, 2007 11:10 AM

************
Gary,
The rainfall will be great for our area because the soil moisture values on the CPC site indicate that we are running below average on soil moisture. Also, these low temperatures seems to be running much above normal. Is their any chance that the pattern will cycle back and give us low temperatures in the 20s and 30s again. I am not quite ready for May/June weather!
Devin
---------------
Devin,

I think we will have a freeze after the average last date this year, which is around April 9th. And, yes, the rainfall will be nice. It should rain Thursday. It better.

Gary

Posted by: Devin at March 21, 2007 12:02 PM

**********
Gary, I absolutely agree that the competition reads your blogs. I can't remember the exact situation but I know it had to do with a snow event. You were the only one predicting a certain situation, no one else was even coming close. Then there was much discussion here on the blog and suddenly the other stations were mimicking your predictions. I recall shaking my head, wondering what that said regarding their confidence in their own predictions. But then I am still unamused by Aaron Barnhart's lack of inclusion of you in his articles and non weather enthusiasts including you in their forecast blasting. You just can't make some folks understand.
----------------
Jeri,

We just have to do our best!

Gary

Posted by: Jeri Correll at March 21, 2007 12:15 PM

***************
Gary, I heard on the Weather Channel, that our average last snow is on March 24th. Is this correct? and when do you see our last chance of snow if we haven't already had it.
------------------------------
Alden,

It snowed on Saturday, and 2 inches fell in central Missouri. A year ago a huge snowstorm just missed us during this week. But, this year I don't see another chance unless something happens when the cold part of our pattern returns in April. It is usually too late by mid April so we will see.

Gary

Posted by: Alden at March 21, 2007 12:50 PM

*********************
Gary and the weather team, I am assuming you have read the NWS spring forecast. It is on Topeka's NWS site. It will be interesting to see how it aligns up and or falls apart in three months against the LRC. Thanks, Michael/Topeka/Berryton
--------------------
Michael,

It is wrong.

Gary

Posted by: michael huffman at March 21, 2007 1:28 PM

********************
Gary,
I will say this, when I asked the SPC folks what they do if the NWS in that CWA says no to the watch, they indicated they will normally try to convince them. This being the case, I can understand this current Thunderstorm Watch. Additionally, the SPC has since backed off on the Southern part based on vapor/radar as has the NWS. Provided the time the watch was issued, I can see the acceptance, and now the subsequent doubt and soon to be cancelled watch.

As far as your thought on competitive analysis..specfic to this blog. I will say, there are many times of very good analysis your team puts out, but I would be somewhat puzzled if the analysis you provide is truly helpful to the competition. Not that what you put out is not valuable, but in the interest of appealing to a larger audience that may not have all the knowledge, many times...you put things in simple terms, that even a first year meteorologist student could deduce. [Please, this statement is not to diminish your teams ability, but to show perhaps the gap of the competition] If this is valuable to the competition to affect their forecasts, then…um…nothing more to say. Conversely, if the competition is gleaning information from the entries from the bloggers, then…again…um..nothing more to say.

The only competitive advantage you disclose/disseminate in the blog is the LRC. As much as others may disagree, perhaps there is a non-disclosed usage of this theory, and a subsequent smear/PR game at play.

Gosh..at this point, I may start guarding the SMC a bit more closely…I would hate for this to be used for an upcoming weather special on another channel. LOL
--------------------------
Scott,

Will you let us use the SMC? LOL Interesting and complex thoughts.

Gary

Posted by: Scott at March 21, 2007 1:38 PM

**************
Is it necessary to use the letter "E" when referring to the new Fujita scale? I noticed recently that since the revised scale has come out the E is used when referencing it. It's still the Fujita scale, right? EF5 just doesn't roll off the tongue.
-------------------
Dwight,

Say EF 50 times in a row and then say EF 5. It works. Or just say EF as it sounds "F" and that works too. LOL

Gary

Posted by: Dwighit at March 21, 2007 2:02 PM

******************
Looks like you were right about the SVR thunderstorm watch, Gary. It's pretty much all been canceled.
------------------
Justin,

I just wish they wouldn't have issued it.

Gary

Posted by: Justin at March 21, 2007 2:24 PM

*****************
Gary,
Thank you for being so considerate of your viewers. I realize for some a severe weather outbreak is like Christmas, but to know that you're looking out for those of us who are TERRIFIED of severe weather means a lot. To hear of a potential severe weather outbreak so far in advance (more than a day) is disconcerning. I know, personaly, it does nothing for my ulcers. I'm a worrier by nature. I've been scared of thunderstorms since I was little, and at the ripe age of 28, I can't say that I've progressed in calming my fear as much as I'd like to. I am a firm believer in the saying "knowledge is power." And knowing as much about thunderstorms and what to do in the event of severe weather as I can, helps me with my fear. Just another reason why I check out the blog EVERY day! In short, thanks for listening to us. Thanks for informing us. Thanks for being dependable. And thanks for being the best!
-----------------------
Emily,

This severe weather season will be challenging. We will keep you advised!

Gary

Posted by: Emily at March 21, 2007 2:28 PM

****************
Gary,

I think you should mention when it almost looks obvious that we'll get severe weather out of a system in advance, but emphasize things can change. Often times we'll get severe weather to set up in the region and that's obvious, you can say it looks like the system in 4 days has the potential to cause severe weather somewhere in the region. Obviously, its too tough to predict severe weather and pinpoint it down days in advance!
---------------------
Jon,

And we will. This week is not obvious, but there is a potential for some hail on Thursday.

Gary

Posted by: Jon at March 21, 2007 3:16 PM

****************
Our average last frost is April 13th and I really think we're done with the frost. We're running amazingly close to the same hi and low temp and precip as last year and that rarely happens. Our last freeze last year was March 25th and our last frost (33') was April 9th in Lee's Summit-only noticed frost on roof tops.
GaryB.
-----------------
Gary,

I expect them both to be later this year.

Gary

Posted by: GaryB. at March 21, 2007 3:48 PM

*********************
As far as the Spring forecast from the NWS...does this really tell us anything? I appreciate the work of the CRC, but trending with percentages without quantifiable data is a bit of a guess. I hate long term models. El Nino was suppose to be wet for So. Cal, and they are nearing droughts...

Models can only trend on very disperse data trends and often end up in the trash after the year proves itself out.

That being said, if you could model out the LRC, that would be interesting to see. Not that all the factors would make it more reliable, but the basis is pretty sound.

I am seeing out there next week may have some outbreak potential as we have been squeaking about early next week between blog entries. I didn't mention tornados, so this should be ok to say...LOL.

Last note..reading another source regarding the Moore OK. tornado [99], here is an interesing excerpt:

"Tornado forecasting is still in a primitive stage
A day before the May 3 tornado outbreak, the Storm Prediction Center was only forecasting their lowest alert level for severe weather, a "Slight Risk". The computer models were highly scattered in their predictions, and made significant changes with each new run. Nothing about the outbreak was textbook. Most supercell thunderstorms that spawn tornadoes form along a warm or cold front (or a "dryline" where a sharp gradient of moisture is present). However, none of the first few supercells in the May 3 outbreak were near a front or dryline. The classic clash of warm moist Gulf air with cold, dry Canadian air that usually provides the lift needed for supercells was not present. Researchers have a huge amount of work to do before they understand what causes tornadoes like the May 3, 1999 storm." ]Credit Dr. Jeff Masters - http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/show.html]

Just goes to show you...models don't have all the answers, nor does the SPC or NWS. This is why education, discussion, and communication such as this blog and media responsibility are all key in helping save lives in the future!
----------------------------
Scott,

I remember that day well. May 3, 1999. There was a slight risk. There was some big concerns of a cap and there wouldn't be even one thunderstorm, but that morning it became apparant that it would be a dramatic day. And, it turned into one of the worst days ever. Storm Dog was in Oklahoma that day. He may be able to add more, no pun intended (MOORE was hit hard). I went down there and saw the concrete slabs. There was literally nothing left of homes. The foundations had not even a piece of wood left.

Scott,

I see a chance next week! But, let's see how this week sets up first.

Gary

Posted by: Scott at March 21, 2007 4:46 PM

**************
"" Speaking of drama.....the station that said "sleep in your basements" last time also had their current radar on the TV screen during programming last night. Would you have any clue as to why they did that?? Their were some showers to the east but nothing big...it was kinda weird I thought. So during a commercial I changed channels to see if you or anyone else had theirs up and no body else did. Weird huh? ""


There was a severe thunderstorm warning to the south, in one of the counties the other station covers. I didn't see the TV, but I know there was a warning in their coverage area. It was for damaging winds. Petis county I believe.

David
--------------------------
David,

There were no warnings last night? So, who knows why they did that. We just had a few showers and thunderstorms with fog last night.

Gary

Posted by: David, Lenexa at March 21, 2007 5:26 PM

*****************
Gary,
I'm glad I set up the DVR for tonight's severe weather show. I won't be home in time for it. However, in one of your earlier posts, you said "This severe weather season will be challenging". Do you mean more so than usual? If so, why? Thanks!
--------------------
Matt,

There are always challenges. If we have back to back to back severe weather days it can wipe you out. This could happen this year in May or June.

Gary

Posted by: Matt P at March 21, 2007 6:06 PM

**********
"David,

There were no warnings last night? So, who knows why they did that. We just had a few showers and thunderstorms with fog last night.

Gary"

Incorrect, according to the NWS in Springfield there were multiple warnings last night. In areas just south of Clinton and Sedalia. Trees and powerlines both broken. There was only one station in the metro that covered this information and they even started their 10pm newscast with the information Thank goodness there weren't any tornadoes.

Your scope must be too narrow once again.
--------------------------
Jim,

We had it covered. I showed ESP:LIVE last night and we talked about the showers and thunderstorms. Those, that you are talking about, were well south of our viewing area.

My scope must be too narrow again? I really don't know what you are talking about. That was in Vernon county, so you are correct about that cell. Will you please forgive me.

Gary

Posted by: Jim at March 21, 2007 9:09 PM

 
 

March 2009

S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31        

 December 2007
 August 2007
 April 2007
 March 2007
 February 2007
 January 2007
 December 2006
 November 2006
 October 2006
 September 2006
 August 2006
 July 2006
 June 2006
 May 2006
 April 2006
 March 2006
 February 2006
 January 2006
 December 2005
 November 2005
 October 2005
 September 2005
 August 2005
 July 2005
 June 2005
 May 2005
 April 2005
 March 2005

Site Extras

© 2003 - 2006 The E.W. Scripps Co.
Privacy Policy | User Agreement
EEO Public File: 2004 | 2005 | 2006

DIY Network

Fine Living

Food Network

HGTV
Comparison Shop for Cosmetics and Bedroom Furniture at Shopzilla &